// When contemporary composers keep adding more and more ridiculous extended techniques to their music//

marimbamixolydia:

rmichaelwahlquist:

whatshouldwecallclarinet:

image

It doesn’t end. As long as there are techniques, we will extend them. 

E X  T   E    N     D

I’m inclined to make a case that all currently standard techniques began as extended techniques themselves. Vibrato, overblowing to the second or third note in the harmonic series, thumb position, double-tonguing, sul ponticello…

Hell, even just the idea of an instrument is pretty far out. “Hey, I’m going to blow into this tube with holes in it.” “Cool, I’m going to attach strings of desiccated animal innards to a wooden box and scrape them with horse hair attached to a stick (or initially probably a literal archery bow).” “Hey man, wtf are you doing stretching that gazelle hyde over a hollowed-out log?? I was going to use that as a rug!”

… although I will concede that some extended techniques are stupid and probably attempts to play the game of “I’m-More-Avant-Garde-Than-You-So-This-Music-Must-Mean-Something-And-If-You-Don’t-Get-It-You’re-Unintelligent-And-A-Square”. (I’ve been guilty of this occasionally.)

But still, in the process of trying any and all ideas we can think of, we find much which is rubbish, but more importantly, a little of what is truly valuable.

One of my favorite quotes:
Niels Bohr — “An expert is a person who has made all the mistakes that can be made in a very narrow field.”

…perhaps a bit of hyperbole, but I think expresses a profound and often ignored truth. It turns out that fear of mistakes is, for many, a prison for ambition, inner passion, curiosity, and the joy of exploration and discovery. So shove an orange in a clarinet and try to play it underwater while sitting on a timpano with two angry cats inside it.

(I like percu22’s succinct comment better than my long-winded one though)

(via theorchestra)

(Source: Spotify)

psybelius:

string player problems

psybelius:

string player problems

(via )

KELP trio at The Independent in Tampa, FL

Watts Shimmura - bass
Lance Cox - drums
Tom Kersey - cello

KELP trio at The Independent in Tampa, FL

Watts Shimmura - bass
Lance Cox - drums
Tom Kersey - cello

(Source: Spotify)

santafeu:

Sheet music in Benildus - down the Contemporary Music hallway.

santafeu:

Sheet music in Benildus - down the Contemporary Music hallway.

(via compositionislife)

eskisanat:

“Music begins where the possibilities of language end.”

- Jean Sibelius

(via compositionislife)

taliabobalia:

who you are in high school is not who you will be in college and who you are in college is not who you will be when you are 30.

when you accept that you are malleable and ever-changing, you will be less resistant to new ways of thinking and being and you will grow into the beautiful person you are meant to become.

resist the urge to remain stagnant. there are always things to learn about the world and yourself. let yourself learn them.

(via etheral-merkabah)

youdidwhatnow:

Charles Mingus

Mingus!

youdidwhatnow:

Charles Mingus

Mingus!

(via richvanvoorst)

Dvorak: Serenade for strings in E major - 2. Tempo di valse

(Source: fyeahclassicalcomposers)

for Alex DeLeon

(Source: Spotify)

Early morning routine with Ursula and Jude.
www.tomkersey.com

Early morning routine with Ursula and Jude.

www.tomkersey.com

sCARY CELLo!  :o

Yes.  Halloween gig.  Improvisation, Bach, and Monk.  No major keys.  Memory death.  Scary.

Tom Kersey, cello

www.tomkersey.com

you are
an aperture
through which
the universe
becomes aware
of itself
- Alan Watts